Writing and acorns and a new year…

Once again, we’ve crossed the Great Plains and wound down through New Mexico and northern Arizona to the Mogollon Rim. Today, Lance tackled some window cleaning, and I texted some friends and family this photo of him at work.

Not to be outdone, he texted this one, with the following caption:

IMG_1696                                           WHAT WRITERS DO.

What can I say? I was having a New Year’s moment, filled with gratitude for being here in the Arizona mountains, and for some potential good news about one of my submitted manuscripts. I’m a writer, so I guess this IS what writers do!

I also heard from WordCrafts Press that A PURPOSE TRUE is on sale now through January 1, 2018, one half off, exclusively at Smashwords.com. You can purchase ebooks in a variety of formats, including .epub for e-readers like Nook, Kobo, iPad, etc., and in .mobi for Kindle. Just go to the site and the discount is already in place.

Later in the day, Lance found time to attend to his hobby…the woodpeckers are still here!


Still eating acorns and leaving the tops behind.


Leaving behind what we don’t need…not a bad philosophy as another year rolls around. Fears, doubts, misgivings, conflicts – moving away from them all and into 2018.

The Adventure of Writing

“Fiction is art and art is the triumph over chaos… to celebrate a world that lies spread out around us like a bewildering and stupendous dream.”

― John Cheever

Since I’ve never thought of myself as very organized, it’s interesting to ponder writing fiction as triumphing over chaos. But for any of us who has  attempted to control circumstances and people, it makes perfect sense to strive over what T.S. Eliot terms the general mess of imprecision of feeling, Undisciplined squads of emotion.



Isn’t that what wrens do when they set up housekeeping in a world of predators ready to disrupt their nesting?

Ah, yes. That’s what control freaks try to manage–the inner chaos. Of course, our actions spread out to those around us, and we get the sense we’re doing well, even if everyone else is chafing at the bit.

Anyway, writing fiction helps this type of personality by giving us a whole set of characters to manage. To bring to life on the page, with all their secrets and foibles, passions and dreams.

I just read about an author hard at work on a sequel to her first novel. This past year, life has given her more than a full platter of challenges, including grief, but she’s finding joy in working with her characters.


Kind of like gardening…cooperative plants like ajuga grow just about anywhere with relish,




same for Shasta daisies–we can count on them to flourish and multiply with little care,



while others require a gentle hand, lots of water, and shade.



But the act of tending these plants nurtures us. What a gift–glorious July blossoms to delight the eye!

Much like flowers, the gift we receive in focusing on our stories nurtures us, too. What can we say but thanks?